Adventure Education

  • Students helping another student climb a wooden fence.

    CoSer: 401.010
    Carolann James, Program Coordinator
    (516) 396-2264
    cjames@nasboces.org

    Adventure Education Programs – These activities facilitate personal and interpersonal growth (communication, problem-solving, trust-building, risk-taking, and cooperation). They are excellent choices for sports and work teams, peer counseling groups, at-risk students, teacher in-services, and all groups seeking a strong cooperative experience.

    Teambuilding Activities are instrumental in the practice of SEDL skills (social, emotional, development and learning) and help to meet district goals for addressing the Dignity Act and 21st Century skills. See our:

    "It is a fun way for the kids to learn ...and they hardly realized they WERE learning things about themselves and their peers. They really learned to trust one another and problem solve" ~ 5th grade teacher

    Groups move through a series of hands-on activities designed to develop communication, cooperation, trust, and problem-solving skills in an atmosphere of safety, respect, and fun.

    Low Challenge Course: New Games, Initiatives and Low Elements: Groups move through a series of hands-on activities designed to develop communication, cooperation, trust, and problem-solving skills in an atmosphere of safety, respect, and fun. Participants are guided in making connections between these activities and "real-life" situations. Teachers report a positive impact on classroom climate, student performance, and interpersonal dynamics when these activities are reinforced in the classroom.

    High Challenge Course: High Ropes Experience (Middle School-adult): These activities build upon the group skills and trust developed in the low elements experience. All high elements are at a 25-35 foot height and present individuals with a personal challenge of expanding one's comfort zone with the support of the larger group.  Three parallel cables/ropes are set in a triangular fashion – bottom foot cable with two hand lines about four feet above that foot cable. Student teams assist our staff in supporting each climber. Positive communication, trust, and appropriate risk-taking are all elements of this process.

    Note: We have a new Ropes Course! After several years of planning we are very happy to report that Project Adventure, Inc. has designed and built a great course for us! Cat Walk is a level log secured between two support trees. With a little tensioned help from the belayer and a modicum of personal commitment, almost anyone can make the walking passage! Five new elements plus our traditional "Flying Squirrel" and Climbing Wall await your students:

    Burma Bridge – Three parallel cables/ropes are set in a triangular fashion – bottom foot cable with two hand lines about four feet above that foot cable. As with any high traversing element, an overhead belay cable parallels the lower cables. This is one of the easiest high elements to complete, thus providing a good choice for those feeling highly challenged just by being at elevation.

    Multivine Traverse is a taut horizontal foot cable with sequenced vertical hand ropes interspersed throughout the crossing. Cat Walk is a level log secured between two support trees. With a little tensioned help from the belayer and a modicum of personal commitment, almost anyone can make the walking passage!

    Multivine Traverse is a taut horizontal foot cable with sequenced vertical hand ropes interspersed throughout the crossing. Lilly Pads offers the climber a series of suspended "discs" to walk across the "pond" with the assistance of a ground crew who use ropes to help stabilize the "Lilly Pads" From the initial support pole a participant must move out on the cable and eventually lunge for a hanging rope that is two to three feet beyond their farthest stretching reach. This slide-lunge routine is continued until the far support tree is reached.

    Lilly Pads offers the climber a series of suspended "discs" to walk across the "pond" with the assistance of a ground crew who use ropes to help stabilize the "Lilly Pads" Swing Shot is a simple, wonderful thrill! The participant is clipped in and hauled back through "a pulley system by his/her teammates.

    Swing Shot is a simple, wonderful thrill! The participant is clipped in and hauled back through "a pulley system by his/her teammates. At a point determined by the participant, the haul rope is released and shoots earthward, with gravitational and centrifugal forces coming into play. The Flying Squirrel is similar to the Swing Shot but now the participant is clipped in from behind along with a supporting shoulder harness.

    The Flying Squirrel is similar to the Swing Shot but now the participant is clipped in from behind along with a supporting shoulder harness. They are in-charge to determine the degree of swing and height and are supported throughout with their "haul team"

    "The Wall" is a 32-foot high structure with climbing and rappelling routes which present the student with a level of challenge suited to his or her abilities and desires.Climbing Wall (Middle School-adult): "The Wall" is a 32-foot high structure with climbing and rappelling routes which present the student with a level of challenge suited to his or her abilities and desires. Teams of students assist our staff in providing the necessary ground support so that everyone is engaged throughout this experience.

    Teambuilding takes place with "other" types of activities, too! Choose one of these if you also want to incorporate science (ecology) and math skills:

    Students discuss basic human needs and how to respond in a survival situation. Activities may include shelter building, fire building, the acquisition of food and water, trail-marking, and basic first aid. Survival
    Students discuss basic human needs and how to respond in a survival situation. Activities may include shelter building, fire building, the acquisition of food and water, trail-marking, and basic first aid. The importance of cooperation and shared decision making is emphasized in this activity.

    Applying mathematical and problem-solving skills, students learn how to use a compass and calculate distance through pacing. Orienteering
    Applying mathematical and problem-solving skills, students learn how to use a compass and calculate distance through pacing. Groups then work cooperatively to complete an orienteering course.